April 15, 2024
A.I

Researchers say we are entering the Fifth Industrial Revolution in which humans and AI-powered machines work together

  • Scientists, engineers and business leaders are preparing for “unprecedented” and “previously unimaginable” interconnections between humans and AI.
  • Some call it “the cognitive era,” as AI will interpret data from its own sensors.
  • READ MORE: ‘Groundbreaking’ brain chips allow 68-year-old woman to ‘speak’ 13 years after suffering from same disorder that killed astrophysicist Stephen Hawking



Humanity has entered the Fifth Industrial Revolution (IR 5.0): a new, deeper collaboration between humans and artificial intelligence across the economy.

While Industry 5.0 is believed to have begun in 2020, the rise of AI in recent years has accelerated it, leading experts to say that it is only now “coming.”

Researchers predict this new revolution It will be a ‘sensory leap’ with respect to the current AI -which interacts mainly with human beings through text commands- to the so-called “multimodal interaction”, which will be much more human.

And some call this change the “Cognitive Age.”

Imagine AI-powered robots that see, hear, touch and more, gathering new data from those sets of sensors to synthesize it with the vast arrays of digital data stored elsewhere online.

Brain-computer interfaces, such as Elon Musk’s Neuralink, will also play a role in IR 5.0.

The era is a big leap from the First Industrial Revolution, which scholars typically define as beginning in the mid-18th century, when inventor Thomas Newcomen’s steam engine began to achieve widespread commercial use.

The era is a big leap from the First Industrial Revolution, which scholars typically define as beginning in the mid-18th century, when inventor Thomas Newcomen’s steam engine began to achieve widespread commercial use.

John Nosta, who runs the health innovation think tank NostaLab in New Jersey, has argued that this new industrial revolution, however, will inevitably alter the way we think about humans and machines as distinct categories in the first place. place.

“Integrating sensory capabilities into AI models is not simply a technological leap,” Nosta wrote in a recent essay for Psychology Today.

“It represents a shift in our philosophical understanding of artificial and human intelligence.”

He has also referred to the new era as ‘the Cognitive Age”, which will radically change the way humans live, work and think about themselves.

“As we navigate this cognitive revolution,” Nosta said, “the opportunity at hand is to become the architects of a future in which technology and humanity not only coexist but are co-evolutionary.”

According to Nosta, who taught at futurist Ray Kurzweil’s Singularity University, humans don’t typically think of computers as “experiencing” the world on their own.

But that assumption will be challenged as more advanced AI systems connect to ever larger sensors.

In other words, machines will not simply be logical boxes into which humans enter data and commands to process.

AI will increasingly collect that data on its own and experience the world on its own.

“The introduction of speech and image recognition capabilities into ChatGPT has transformed it from a unimodal to a multimodal system,” Nosta cited as an example, “exponentially expanding its interactional richness and contextual understanding.”

“It’s not just about understanding the words, but also about grasping the nuances of tone, tone and emphasis, which add layers of meaning that are often absent in written text.”

“Image recognition adds another layer of complexity,” he added. “For example, it can analyze photographs, identify objects and even understand the emotional content of facial expressions.”

Brain-computer interfaces, such as Elon Musk’s Neuralink, will also play a role in IR 5.0
Imagine AI-powered robots that see, hear, touch and more, gathering new data from all those sets of sensors to synthesize it with the vast array of digital data stored elsewhere online.

Nosta believes this heralds a rapidly advancing “monumental leap” in machine learning that will allow AI to “understand the world in a way closer to how humans experience it,” giving machines “a more holistic understanding of the world.” context”.

‘Unlike its predecessors, the 5IR [Nosta’s acronym for the Fifth Industrial Revolution] “It promises to be cognitive in nature, characterized by an unprecedented synergy between human and machine intelligence,” he wrote.

These new AI coworkers, according to Nosta, “will enrich the human experience in ways previously unimaginable.”

“There were almost two centuries between the first and second industrial revolutions,” as South Africa’s Regenesys Business School in Johannesburg put it.

‘Most of us reading this article will have experienced the last three industrial revolutions in our lifetime, and there will be more to come!’

The Johannesburg-based business school is just one of many university-level programs attempting to research and teach its students about the still-emerging Fifth Industrial Revolution.

Seton Hall in New Jersey offers a three-credit course on this latest era in human technology and commerce; MIT has brought in guest speakers to lecture on the concept, and many other research institutions are doing the same.

Hoping to get ahead of the revolution’s rapid economic changes, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), administered by the U.S. Department of Commerce, donated approximately $300,000 to the engineering school at the University of Cincinnati (UC) in 2022.

READ MORE: UN warns that brain chips like Elon Musk’s Neuralink could be used as weapons to ‘alter personality’, as FDA approves technology for human trials

In a report, UNESCO’s International Bioethics Committee called for protected “neurorights,” “transparency in data privacy,” and strategies to anticipate and prevent abuses of neurotechnology.

With the grant, UC engineers will investigate how AI can be deployed to aid manufacturing at two proposed Intel Corp plants nearby in Columbus, Ohio.

“As we look ahead and plan for the workforce of the future, we must also ensure that human intelligence is fully utilized,” UC College of Engineering and Applied Sciences Dean John Weidner said in a statement.

“Industry 5.0 enables workers to leverage advanced technologies like AI to integrate human intelligence into a new and innovative manufacturing ecosystem.”

But despite this optimism, some industry leaders have expressed caution, publicly worrying about “a crisis of confidence in technology,” which could occur without adequate safeguards if these revolutionary technological changes occur.

“In the Fifth Industrial Revolution, we are going to have to have another official who is the Director of Ethical and Human Use,” Marc Benioff, founder and co-CEO of Salesforce said at the World Economic Forum in 2019 when the IR 5.0 debate began.

Benioff said the new executive’s role would be to answer the question: “Are we using these technologies for the good of the world?”

While there is still much debate about what form this new technological revolution might take, many in these scientific and economic disciplines agree on the need for policies to make the Fifth Industrial Revolution more ethical and human-friendly than some of its predecessors. .

“This fifth wave of technology development has enormous potential to truly put people at the center of its design,” as Louise McEntee, director of intelligent automation at Deloitte, told The Irish Times this summer.

“We need to understand these new capabilities, how best to center them around people and their needs, and address their concerns to design and legislate for ‘bad actors,’ as with any new technology,” he said.

“But the possibilities of what we can do with this and the potential benefits are enormous.”

McEntee is optimistic that this is possible and even went so far as to dismiss fears that too many human jobs could be replaced, en masse, by automated AI tools.

“Every significant technological change, the age of the steam engine, the age of science and mass production and the rise of digital technology,” he noted, “has meant radical changes in the way we work.”

“However, work did not disappear, but rather evolved to meet the needs of business, society and the individual.”

“Human society,” McEntee said, “has always evolved.”

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